queenofsix:

vampire-kingmarshall-lee:

chinup-chestout:

It’s like in the second to last gif the owl is saying “I got kissed by a really cute boy”

"…oh my" 

This owl is so beautiful??????!!

This owl is prettier than most people 

THOSE EYELASHES

grapeson:

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

Brilliant teenage GIRLS, specifically.

grapeson:

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

Brilliant teenage GIRLS, specifically.

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

scavengedluxury:

Leadenhall Market. London, June 2014.

scavengedluxury:

Leadenhall Market. London, June 2014.

jaclcfrost:

becoming attached to characters that you know are gonna die more like i didn’t sign up for this. i mean. i did sign up for it. i just didn’t read the fine print. i mean. i did read the fine print. but i still signed it. why did i sign it

miriamforster:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION


This is probably the best piece of science I’ve ever heard in my life. I’ve actually been using it to try and remember things I need to do later. I try and mentally place that memory in the room I’ll be in when I need to do it. Like if I suddenly remember I need to do something on the computer tomorrow, but i’m in bed and don’t have my phone handy to take notes, I’ll imagine myself sitting in the living room, on the couch, doing the thing. Mentally placing that reminder in the other room, so to speak. I haven’t been trying it for very long, so it could be coincidence, but I actually feel like I’m remembering things better now. SCIENCE!

miriamforster:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

This is probably the best piece of science I’ve ever heard in my life.

I’ve actually been using it to try and remember things I need to do later. I try and mentally place that memory in the room I’ll be in when I need to do it. Like if I suddenly remember I need to do something on the computer tomorrow, but i’m in bed and don’t have my phone handy to take notes, I’ll imagine myself sitting in the living room, on the couch, doing the thing. Mentally placing that reminder in the other room, so to speak. I haven’t been trying it for very long, so it could be coincidence, but I actually feel like I’m remembering things better now.

SCIENCE!

sheereleganceinitssimplicity:

"average author kills 3 characters each series" factoid is actually just statistical error. average author kills 0 characters per series. Georg R. R. Martin who lives in a cave & kills about 56.2 characters per book, is an outlier adn should not have been counted

(inspired by comic-sans-voice)

hedgehog-goulash7:

preludes-and-prufrock:

awwdish:

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

Reblogging this for my art history class this semester

buwhahaha

The art historian in me had to reblog this.